Sunday, November 18th, 2018

What’s on the ballot

PORTLAND, MAINE -- 10/03/18 -- FILE --Democratic candidate for governor Janet Mills onstage at a forum in Portland. Troy R. Bennett | BDN
USM Free Press
PORTLAND, MAINE -- 10/03/18 -- FILE --Democratic candidate for governor Janet Mills onstage at a forum in Portland. Troy R. Bennett | BDN

Posted on October 21, 2018 in News
By USM Free Press

PORTLAND, MAINE -- 10/03/18 -- FILE --Republican candidate for governor Shawn Moody onstage at a forum in Portland. Troy R. Bennett | BDN
USM Free Press
PORTLAND, MAINE -- 10/03/18 -- FILE --Republican candidate for governor Shawn Moody onstage at a forum in Portland. Troy R. Bennett | BDN

By:  Melissa Fraser, Staff Writer 

All nonpartisan information within this article was sourced from the League of Women Voters of Maine and Ballotpedia.

Question 1: Citizen Initiative
“Do you want to create the Universal Home Care Program to provide home-based assistance to people with disabilities and senior citizens, regardless of income, funded by a new 3.8 percent tax on individuals and families with Maine wage and adjusted gross income above the amount subject to Social Security taxes, which is $128,400 in 2018?”

What does this question mean?
This initiative would fund the Universal Home Care Program, which will provide long-term care and services to disabled and elderly people in their homes at no cost to them or to their families. This would enact a non-wage income and payroll tax of 3.8 percent on individual and joint incomes over $128,400 that are currently exempt from the Federal Social Security Tax.

Question 2: Wastewater Bond
“Do you favor a $30,000,000 bond issue to improve water quality, support the planning and construction of wastewater treatment facilities and assist homeowners whose homes are served by substandard or malfunctioning wastewater treatment systems?”

What does this question mean?
This bond would improve the water quality within the state through wastewater treatment. The money would be split, with $350,000 to assist homeowners in fixing septic tanks, cesspools and other disposal systems, $2 million to replace broken septic systems that pollute coastal watersheds and $27.6 million for local wastewater treatment facilities. The state would borrow the funds to finance the bond.

Question 3: Transportation Bond
“Do you favor a $106,000,000 bond issue, including $101,000,000 for construction, reconstruction and rehabilitation of highways and bridges and for facilities and equipment related to ports, piers, harbors, marine transportation, freight and passenger railroads, aviation, transit and bicycle and pedestrian trails, to be used to match an estimated $137,000,000 in federal and other funds and $5,000,000 for the upgrade of municipal culverts at stream crossings?”

What does this question mean?
This bond would improve and repair bridges, highways, ports, harbors, airports, railroads, walking and bicycle paths. The state would borrow $106 million and be matched $142 million from the federal government and other sources if the bond passes.

Question 4: Universities Bond
“Do you favor a $49,000,000 bond issue to be matched by at least $49,000,000 in private and public funds to modernize and improve the facilities and infrastructure of Maine’s public universities in order to expand workforce development capacity and to attract and retain students to strengthen Maine’s economy and future workforce?”

What does this question mean?
This bond would fund the remodeling and construction of new and existing facilities within the University of Maine System, to further workforce development and attract and retain students. The state would borrow $49 million, which would need to be matched by public and private funds to be received.

Question 5: Community Colleges Bond
“Do you favor a $15,000,000 bond issue to improve educational programs by upgrading facilities at all seven of Maine’s community colleges in order to provide Maine people with access to high-skill, low-cost technical and career education?”

What does this question mean?
This bond would be distributed to Maine’s seven community colleges for the expansion and renovation of instructional laboratories, information technology and heating and ventilating systems.

Governor of Maine
Elected every four years, the Governor carries out laws, chooses people to run government agencies, and nominates judges. Governors can suggest new laws and they can veto bills that the Legislature passes. Voters can elect a Governor for two terms for a total of eight years.
Alan Caron (I) – Caron, 66, of Freeport, is the founder and CEO of Envision Maine. His goals are to build a new economy that’s driven by the state’s innovators and entrepreneurs, to create an efficient and modern government and to bring Energy Independence to the state.
Terry Hayes (I) – Hayes, 59, of Buckfield, served four terms in the Maine House of Representatives from 2006 to 2014. Her goal is to unite all parties around solutions that will attract skilled workers, prepare students for the workforce of the future and lower health care costs in the state.
Janet Mills (D) – Mills, 70, of Farmington, is Maine’s current attorney general. Her goal is to continue to improve Maine’s economy, improve healthcare costs and funding education within the state.
Shawn Moody (R) – Moody, 58, of Gorham, founded Moody’s Collision Centers. His goal is to continue to grow the state’s economy, to create good paying jobs and to lower healthcare costs.

U.S. Senator
The Senate consists of 100 members, with two representatives from each state. Senators write and vote on laws for the country. Senators approve federal judges, cabinet members, and foreign ambassadors chosen by the president. Serving a six year term, voters can re-elect as many terms as they choose.
Eric Brakey (R)
Angus King (I)
Zak Ringelstein (D)

U.S. Representative
Members of the House of Representatives share the job of writing and passing laws for the United States with Senators. Representatives introduce bills and resolutions that raise money for government programs, offer amendments and serve on committees. Maine has two members in the House of Representatives, voters can elect every two-years for as many terms as they choose.
District 1
Marty Grohman (I)
Mark Holbrook (R)
Chellie Pingree (D)

District 2
Tiffany Bond (I)
Jared Golden (D)
Will Hoar (I)
Bruce Poliquin (R)

Questions on the ballot in Gorham
Question 1: “Do you favor a plan for the Gorham School Department to join the Greater Sebago Education Alliance Regional Service Center through an inter-local agreement that will allow the School Department to receive additional revenue through the state funding formula and to more efficiently procure goods and services?”

What does this question mean?
The public schools of Gorham have been working together with 10 nearby school districts to create the Greater Sebago Education Alliance, a regional service center that will provide joint staff training and development, food purchasing, diversity recruitment processes and more. The State Department of Education has approved the regional service center, state law requires that a regional service center receives town approval through a local vote.

Questions on the ballot in Portland

Question 1: “Do you favor the formation of a regional service center pursuant to an Interlocal Agreement for the Greater Sebago Education Alliance, as approved by the governing bodies of the parties thereto and the Commonisioner of the Department of Education?”

What does this question mean?
Portland Public Schools have been working together with 10 nearby school districts to create the Greater Sebago Educational Alliance, a regional service center that will provide joint staff training and development, food purchasing, diversity recruitment processes and more. The State Department of Education has approved the regional service center, state law requires that a regional service center receives town approval through a local vote.

Question 2: “Shall the City approve the charter amendment to Article IV, § 11, printed below? ‘In addition to the reports required for municipal candidates by title 21-A of the Maine Revised Statutes, 42 day pre-election reports must be filed by municipal candidates no later than 11:59 p.m. on the 42nd day before the day on which a general election is held and must be completed as of the 49th day before that date.”

What does this question mean?
This would require all candidates that are running for election in Portland City Council, Water District, and School Board to file an additional report 42 days before the election that discloses their expenses and campaign contributions.

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