Wednesday, November 21st, 2018

Transfer students unaware of budget crisis

Bonnie Stearns, director of student services in the college of science, technology and health sciences answers students’ questions at a transfer student open house last Thursday. Though some programs in the college have been cut, she believes the college is thriving and robust.
Sam Hill | The Free Press
Bonnie Stearns, director of student services in the college of science, technology and health sciences answers students’ questions at a transfer student open house last Thursday. Though some programs in the college have been cut, she believes the college is thriving and robust.

Posted on November 17, 2014 in News, Uncategorized
By Emma James

Students visiting USM for an adult, transfer and graduate student open house last week mainly described themselves as being excited to come to the university, but most were completely unaware of any of the program eliminations that have occurred this semester. 

Josh Grassman, hoping to transfer to USM from Sienna College after a hiatus of a few years, was a classics major but will be transferring into the communication program.

Though he is switching majors, he described his feelings as “hurt” after learning about the eliminations of the program he once belonged to.

“I took a couple courses in classics last spring,” said Grassman. “I probably would’ve tried to take more classes if the program wasn’t cut.”

He explained that, although the cuts are saddening, as an outsider he can’t look at USM and criticize.

“Pretty soon my wallet will be a factor and my opinion will matter,” said Grassman. “I can’t complain if I’m not part of the system.”

Tiffany Hart, a student at the University of Maine Orono from 1994-1998 is coming to USM to finish her degree in construction management. She believes that in order for USM to grow as an institution, people need to enroll — not be scared off by the financial crisis.

“If USM is going to get out of it [financial crisis] they need the student numbers,” said Hart. “I’m doing my part to keep my community alive. Maine isn’t going to do well if we don’t have young professionals.”

Lyna Vladimiroff, a California native, was unaware of the eliminations that have taken place over the past two months. As a humanities major, her program was cut just a few months ago.

“Oh my god,” said Vladimiroff. “I had no idea.”

Vladimiroff hasn’t been in school for over 20 years, and has always dreamed of attending USM. She will be the first in her family to go to college.

“I think it [eliminations] are horrible,” said Vladimiroff. “It’s so impish. A lot of people can’t talk to people. They don’t know how. Arts and humanities are so important.”

She described the cuts as “detrimental,” but explained that they do not turn her away from attending USM.

In all three instances, Grassman, Hart and Vladimiroff spoke of the convenience of having a public university so close to their homes.

“It’s just easy to get to,” said Hart.

For many students, seeking an education at a different university is out of the question. Given USM’s non-traditional presence, most students have jobs and, in some cases, families that they cannot uproot to move away.

Bonnie Stearns, director of student services in the college of science, technology and health said that no students have contacted her about applied medical sciences and geosciences, the eliminated programs in her department.

“We are the STEM [science, technology, engineering and math] college and that’s to our benefit,” said Stearns. “It’s unfortunate that we’re losing these amazing programs, but it’s still a robust school. STEM majors are going strong.”

All four agree that, regardless of the financial circumstances USM is facing, it’s important to move forward and look to the future, rather than focus on the negativity of the past.

“We’re supporting the programs we have while supporting our AMS and geosciences faculty and students,” said Stearns. “That’s all we really can do right now.”

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