Tuesday, January 23rd, 2018

Album Review: Bummer But Whatever

Posted on November 04, 2014 in Album Reviews, Arts & Culture
By elledavis

Self-Released Album

Carver Arena, Maine native relocated to West Chester, Pennsylvania for college, released an EP through his solo project, Festiva, earlier on this month.  The EP, Bummer But Whatever, gives listeners a hearty dose of lo-fi configuration in only four tracks.

One of the tracks, titled, “Hell Week,” which goes against everything that could  describe lightheartedness.  Quick stabs of synth and a glitchy drum machine juxtapose contrast with Arena’s voice.  This song portrays the heartbreaking feeling of losing someone and the need to escape the circumstances. “You have no idea how damaging it is / to see you better off with someone else / so now I’m running / far away / from everything and everyone I know.”

The third track on the album titled “Easy Mac and Alcohol,” is a personal anecdote of consuming booze and cheap, processed cheese-carb combinations. This song is simple in its 8-bit melodies that are less abrasive than the first two tracks of the EP.  There doesn’t seem to be a deep, philosophical meaning within this song, but rather a clear image of what it’s like to vicariously live life by somewhat uneventful, but deeply honest lyrics.

“The first time that I got drunk at my parents’ house / I passed out in their garage / And I know that they’re not proud of me / But I think that’s a pretty nice homage.”

The last track on Bummer But Whatever shows a more complex side to Arena’s perspective amongst a repetitive loops of dream synth layered on top of a subtle trance drone.  There’s a feeling that’s more biting about this song, something about it that makes it feel more bitter.  There’s mention again of unwantingly losing someone, but there’s also mention of the desire to intentionally lose someone. “Save that last cigarette for me / And I know that I’ll never see you again.”

Festiva’s first release is promising as far as Indie-pop goes.  He has gotten creative within his bedroom-produced electro-dreamscape and has effectively delivered an attention-catching voice for his music.