Thursday, October 19th, 2017

Students upset over ebola costume get police called on them

At request of the photographer the faces were blurred to “shift the focus from their identity to their actions and impact.”
Shadiyo Ali
At request of the photographer the faces were blurred to “shift the focus from their identity to their actions and impact.”

Posted on October 28, 2014 in News
By Francis Flisiuk

When five students from the multicultural center were hanging out and studying during their weekly “Feel Good Fridays” event, the last thing they expected was to be struck by a torrent of fear, anger and confusion.

As Howa Mohammed, a junior health sciences major, peered out of the center she was shocked to see two people walking down the hall wearing Ebola nurse hazmat suits. Howa Mohammed and several of her friend’s minds instantly went to the worst case scenario: there’s been an outbreak.

“It was terrifying, for a second we thought the area was being quarantined,” said Howa Mohammed.

“I remember my heart was beating so fast,” said Hamdi Hassan, a freshman history major. “They could have caused hysteria.”

Upon realizing that the two hazmat suits were just students in costume for the SNOtober Fest, a yearly costume party organized by the student nurses organization, the girl’s fear quickly turned to anger and disgust.

“We kept hoping that they were astronauts and then we were told that they were meant to be ebola nurses,” said Mohammed. “It just seemed so preposterous and insensitive that someone came up with that costume idea.”

According to Idman Abdulkadir, a junior communications major, choosing a costume like that is extremely rude and offensive, especially in a time where the ebola virus is eradicating the lives of several thousand people around the globe. According to the center for disease control, Ebola has killed more than 4,800 people in West Africa alone, and many people in the states have family that are affected by those deaths.

In an attempt to deal with their anger and confusion in a respectful and non-confrontational way, Hassan called upon her friend Leila Mohamed, a USM graduate and intern at the multicultural center, to approach the nurses and convey their discontent. Leila Mohamed, well versed in how to communicate sensitive issues and combat micro aggression, felt well equipped to talk to the nurses and express her and her friend’s feelings in a respectful way.

“I’ve worked for Portland Student Life for two years now, so I’m well trained in civility and how to avoid conflict,” said Leila Mohamed. “I didn’t demand that they take off their costumes. I just peacefully asked them to recognize the impact of their actions, because some students were really shaken up.”

According to Leila Mohamed, seeing a costume of an ebola nurse can act as a trigger for some people.

Leila Mohamed said that she expected the nurses to be apologetic and understanding, but they were instead passive and slightly rude. Instead the nurses replied that they were just having fun and the whole costume was just a joke. According to Abdulkadir, one of the costumed nurses said “This is America, we have rights.”

Then, in what Abdulkadir called “the worst part of the night,” the cops were called.

After addressing the issue and returning to their study center, the multicultural girls were surprised to see a cop approaching them.

“They took it to the next level by calling the cops,” said Leila Mohamed.

“It was the last thing we expected them to do, and by doing that, we feel like they made into a race issue, when it originally wasn’t one,” said Hassan.

The campus crime report, reads that a “report of an altercation” was taken that day in Woodbury campus center.

According to Abdulkadir, a cop was dispatched because the nurses felt threatened by multicultural students and considered them to be dangerous. Abdulikar and the rest of her friend group believes that they were labeled as a threat because of their race.

“Why would they feel threatened by some girls approaching them and calmly addressing an issue?” asked Abdulkadir. “ When we’re provoked and don’t respond with anger, we’re still labeled as the aggressors. It’s so unfair.”

Abdulkadir believes that if she and her friends were white that this situation would of been resolved without the police. According to Abdulkadir, many people she knows have to go through this incidents of racial micro-aggression on a daily basis.

“They called the police on the people that were offended the most; it makes no sense,” said Abdulkadir. “This school is supposed to foster an environment where students can feel comfortable and safe.”

After reaching out to Abigail Krolak the organizer of the event and a student nurse that was in attendance, they both declined to comment.

 

 

  • F

    I hope the racist students who dressed up as Ebola nurses contract Ebola and die a slow painful death.

  • Anonymous

    You are baiting.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Your kidding right? You mean if it doesn’t meet your agenda 8pi.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    People where them in many facilities in maine everyday. Grow up.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    On Halloween ? Your out of your mind. It’s a costume!

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Racism obviously exists Kay , but those that see it everywhere even where it doesn’t exist as in these costumes don’t do their cause justice. It was an innocent Halloween costume beta grip people.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    I think there was probably scarier outfits on Halloween you think?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Whitey keepin you down ken?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Halloween? You know , when people dress up?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Are you a scaredy pants?

  • Anonymous

    We didn’t have hazmat uniforms… we didn’t have a airport personnel who search disabled youngsters — as just happened two weeks ago – US citizens.

  • Anonymous

    What people keep missing is the original response from the hazmat girls. Once told off, the students were supposed to allow them to do whatever they were doing. After all, they are “already campus leaders.” Funny thing about reasoning with anyone.. it takes time. When you realize that you aren’t getting anywhere, it’s time to call in someone else, which the students did. But, by golly, those hazmat girls had their RIGHTS.

  • Anonymous

    “to the United States… Where freedom of speech means something” as long as it’s in keeping with your own agenda.

  • Anonymous

    If I see anyone, anywhere wearing hazmat uniforms, I’m going to find out why.

  • Anonymous

    “This is America” and you will abuse the freedoms in whatever way suits you.

  • Anonymous

    And if those students who don’t sit around only watching the ends of their own noses had been the ones to spot hazmat uniformed on campus that would be bad, right?

  • Anonymous

    “students who are already leaders on campus and in community ” that and 50 cents… It was reasonable to find hazmat uniforms frightening.

  • Anonymous

    What?

  • Anonymous

    Reactions to media. You’re really a piece of work, aren’t you.

  • Anonymous

    I’d bet you my last dime that the students know far more about this place, “America,” and appreciate it far more, than you ever will.
    There it is — “maybe they shouldn’t be here!”
    “This is America!” Repeat endlessly….

  • Stephanas Razsa

    And waaaaaa waaaaa waaaaa waaaaa

    Sent from my iPad

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Human decency? Nurses dressing up in their gear defies human decency ? Get a grip, I am all for protecting people’s dignity and right. I don’t thing nurses wearing hazmat gear takes away anyone’s dignity. People are all different, but is just don’t see the big deal.
    Sent from my iPad

  • Stephanas Razsa

    So blame the media then?

    Sent from my iPad

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Waaaa. Waaaaaa. Waaaaaaa waaaaaaa

    Sent from my iPad

  • norm

    It is america just because your upset, get over it. What happened to the days were people had thickskin and could just move on with there life????

  • Anonymous

    On the jerk comment score – that one has to be way up there.

  • Anonymous

    Are you kidding? Because the media has made it a “scare.”

  • safw

    As if that makes it okay because it’s a joke? Comedians don’t get a free pass. Everyone should care about human decency. Shut the fuck up.

  • hang3xc

    Another idiot who doesn’t know what “literally” means

  • Stephanas Razsa

    It’s Halloween ?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Kidding? It s all about PC .

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Get a grip, cry me a river

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Learn to read mdgdf

  • Stephanas Razsa

    People in maine are not at risk of Ebola so how is it an Ebola scare?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Lots of comedians joke about AIDS and whatever else. Poor taste maybe but not really anything more than that, get a life and get upset about something that matters.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Huh? Which ones?

  • Stephanas Razsa

    How bout no.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Waaaa. Waaaa. Waaa

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Huh.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Racism? No. Insensitive to some maybe. Not a crime either way.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Dark humor? Get a grip hani. The world does not revolve around your opinion.

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Let’s have a PC meltdown!

  • Stephanas Razsa

    Dark humor, big deal.

  • Bobby Bromack

    not trying to make it a race issue, but claiming if they were white it never would have happened?? When are people going to realize that using the color of your skin as an excuse for something is just as racist as blaming someone for the same reason

  • iwsthr

    No one was making fun of anything, and that was made clear when the students objected – several times. Several apologies were given. If this had been a one time interaction, it would have ended (or so I would like to think). The students felt it necessary to voice their opinion repeated times – that’s intimidating. Then in retaliation for campus security becoming involved, they felt it necessary to post all over social media. But they come from a place of “love and understanding.”

  • ” There are people on campus who still smoke despite rules, wear black and dress in Gothic attire, people who have a cross around their neck, those that take time between classes to pray, some are smart, some have disabilities…”

    You’re missing the point that these people made a MOCKERY of a tragedy that has killed over 5000 people. Wearing black/dressing goth/praying/whatever else you’re talking about isn’t making fun of an epedemic that has killed thousands of people. What if your parents died of Ebola? Would you feel the same way?

    Hell, what if these students dressed up as Adam Lanza? Or zombie Robin Willaims? Or Dzhokhar Tsarnaev?

    I get it now. It’s only a tragedy when cute white kids die; not when 5000 people of color die.

  • HoboGreed

    This article sounds like it was written by a twelve year old.

  • wow

    4 out of the 6 students who were in the center at the time are American citizens, one woman is from Kenya (but she’s lived in America for 4+ years) and the other is from Canada. Assuming someone’s is or isn’t a citizen is racist as fck dude.

  • Stop

    Wrong. only 2 of the 6 students were from other countries(Kenya & Canada). All others were American. But I’d really love to understand when “Multi-Cultural” and “American” became mutually exclusive? Do you need to be reminded about that old saying about assumptions…?

  • gsdr

    too long; didn’t read.

    peace.

  • iwundr

    I have no idea what those letters mean.

  • iwundr

    Thank you. On point. Well said.

  • iwundr

    The threat could have been the “race card” as usual. It was after all the multi-culture group who approached the two nurses. When they found out they were not astronaut suits they became angry and offended. They were the instigators here and they are the ones who made an issue of what costume the two student nurses were wearing. This issue should have stayed within the college.

  • gsdr

    tl;dr

  • iwundr

    The costume industry apparently felt that the protective costume would be very popular this year. I wonder if they “intended” to cause “fear, anger and confusion” when they started manufacturing the costume? I doubt that very much. Everyone in America should have one. This costume will be the most important “item” of all. The emergency “attire” worn by nurses and doctors will save millions of lives. We should be revering this “costume” rather than attempting to throw it in a negative light. It is very likely that these nurses will have to get “comfortable” in this type of gear in the near future. My advise to the “multicultural students” – I am assuming that most of these students are from foreign Countries – if you are going to be getting an education in another Country to at least show a little tolerance while in that Country. It might also be a good idea to learn about Democracy and how that works. When approaching the USM graduate you might have inquired about whether or not your complaining about what these students were attired in, would be violating those students rights /or in any way offend them/? Seems these multi-cultural students are “highly sensitive” whether it is warranted or not.

  • iwundr

    This article is a little confusing. The ladies who “took it to the next level” are complaining that the police were called and that they do not feel that the police would have been called had they been “white”.

    The fact of the matter is that the students of the multi-cultural center are the students “who took it to the next level” when they contacted a USM grad who interns at the multi-cultural center with their costume complaints. Now they complain that the nursing students “took it to the next level” when they contacted the police. It would seem that the nursing students also felt frighten/threatened, when approached by multi-cultural students and their “authority representative.”

    The nursing students did nothing illegal. They were dressed in costumes for “Feel Good Friday.” They were correct when the said: “This is America, we have rights.” I can only image what one might see on “Feel Good Friday” in a college setting.

    //“They took it to the next level by calling the cops,” said Leila Mohamed.//

    //”Why would they feel threatened by some girls approaching them and calmly
    addressing an issue?” asked Abdulkadir. “ When we’re provoked and don’t
    respond with anger, we’re still labeled as the aggressors. It’s so
    unfair.”// Would the intern for the multi-cultural center be considered an authority figure? Isn’t that the reason that those students contacted her in the first place?

    //”We kept hoping that they were astronauts and then we were told that they
    were meant to be ebola nurses,” said Mohammed. “It just seemed so
    preposterous and insensitive that someone came up with that costume
    idea.”//
    This statement proves that they were not initially scared by the costumes. Only after the fact, when it was verified that the nurses intended for their costumes to represent ebola nurses, were the multi-cultural center students offended and angry.

    //”Upon realizing that the two hazmat suits were just students in costume
    for the SNOtober Fest, a yearly costume party organized by the student
    nurses organization, the girl’s fear quickly turned to anger and
    disgust.”// Key words here being “anger and disgust”. She later goes on to say:

    //”Why would they feel threatened by some girls approaching them and calmly
    addressing an issue?” asked Abdulkadir. “ When we’re provoked and don’t
    respond with anger, we’re still labeled as the aggressors. It’s so
    unfair.”// Abdulkadir admits that she and the others at the multi-cultural center were angry and offended by the costumes. In fact they were so angry and offended that they contacted the USM graduate who interns at the center, apparently feeling that her “weight” of position would in fact have more impact that these students protest alone.

    These are college educated students. I believe one student is in her junior year. This is America and we do have rights. It was the white nursing students who’s rights were being violated when the multi-cultural students were protesting about the nursing students choice of costume. In America we do have the freedom to choose; whether others feel the costume is in good taste or not. Happens every year about the same time of the year.
    This complaint sounds more like “reverse discrimination” to me. The violation here was the multi-cultural students trying to suppress the nursing students rights.
    I believe the multi-cultural students were attempting to intimidate the nursing students and those students did the correct thing by contacting the police and bringing it to their attention/documenting the event.

    Everyone who sees this type of costume do not think ebola. Protective gear is used for many things: sometimes a Halloween Costume.

  • stop

    Do you honestly think “HarvardGrad” will make anything you say credible? The fuck.

  • mdgdf

    I can see an ever slight hope of an apology in here…it takes a lot of reading in between the lines, but what a step, yeah? Also, this sounds like a person from the nursing department. too much rhetoric about passion (which is great and we hope all USM students have for the sake of making our world a better place). Again, this is a good step, despite all the weird kumbaya rhetoric. Next time, just come forth and just say it. It saves you time typing and makes the apology (if there was one) more believable.

  • Seth

    I am sure this article is overlooking a lot of facts… Police aren’t just called and dispatched for no reason… Being offended is the lamest excuse in the world. I hold the First Amendment near and dear to my heart. Welcome to the United States… Where freedom of speech means something. Except in ultra liberal academia. I can’t believe I survived four years at USM without being completely brainwashed by their ultra liberal BS.

    .

  • SH

    Yes, 100%, that’s exactly what I’m saying (sarcasm.) This is pointless, feel free to continue trolling the internet, ciao.

  • stfu

    Gotta say some of these commentators are absolute idiots. Where does it once say in the article the students said the outfits were racist? It’s clear some of you lack reading comprehension skills. The students who approached the nurses said their outfits were insensitive which they fucking are. 5,000+ have died in West Africa with deaths in America. The nurses calling the police, later having a male escort them to the bathroom, and then calling the students a bunch of Africans in the police report made it a race issue. It’s evident the nurses have been commenting on this forum since some comments made about blackface were only known with the students involved. Not once did the students who approached the nurses compared it to blackface. So, you can stop with the lies. These students nurses are 30+ but I guess with age does not come with maturity. It’s clear some of these commentators have some sort of hostility towards the multicultural students without reason. And no one gives a shit about the work these student nurses have done. It has nothing to do with this article.

  • Emily

    The joy of living in a country with freedom is in fact freedom. That we have the opportunity to speak up, lead, set examples and are entitled to opinions. Some of those opinions may be offensive to others and this is a risk we at times may run-but more so we run a greater risk when we don’t speak up, don’t set an example, and don’t have our opinions. On Friday night-two nursing students utilized a Halloween party to demonstrate, in light of headlines of EBOLA, CDC attire for handling patients with the disease and their passion for this future profession. They offered a bit of insight, example, passion, and even humor to this possible distress. These two students who are already leaders on campus and in community found the resources of protective attire to be worn to care and model workers they have aspirations of being. These two nurses offered at a party of costumes-with signage all over campus that there was a costume party going on, enlightenment amiss a scary global situation, encouragement for hope and overcoming, and spurring others on with the challenge to create awareness of a desire to help locally and globally. These two students were then attacked because they “offended” another who was “triggered” by their costumes.
    Life is full of offense and triggers. We live in a world where it is impossible to be holistically sensitive to everyone’s needs, emotions, and well being. There are people on campus who still smoke despite rules, wear black and dress in Gothic attire, people who have a cross around their neck, those that take time between classes to pray, some are smart, some have disabilities, some require financial aid, some have expensive cars in the parking lot, some are old, some are young. We all come from different backgrounds, cultures, and even abilities that doesn’t make us any less-it makes us different. It is the power to speak up, the willingness to find humor in a difficult situation, and the leadership by those who are meek to stand up in uniform to set an example that diminish the fear of the outbreaks in this world-both of emotional and physical nature that unites during a storm. To those that felt hurt or offended on Friday night, regardless of skin color-may we each be encouraged to accept each other just a little bit more, and less quick to judge the costumes we wear-on Halloween or any day.

  • kayley

    How did this turn into a race issue, should have interviewed the nurses’ side of the story as well. I feel like this is very one sided.

  • Martin Conte

    I’m curious about why you think it’s relevant that these students did a service trip? The service trip seems completely unrelated to the situation at hand. The article is about a Halloween costume choice; the reporter collected as much information as was available (either of the two girls could’ve explained why they called the police, if they wanted to). Too often, in forums like this one, we leap to conclusions beyond the bounds of what we know and do not know. The fact that these two girls participated in what is obviously a positive, productive service trip, bears no relevance to the issue at hand.

  • Ray B.

    It was written as such in the Police Report. Do some digging up HarvardGrad. The truth is a beautiful thing.

  • Ray B.

    It was written as such in the Police Report. Do some digging up HarvardGrad. The truth shall set you free.

  • spike

    So we should limit free speech to what you deem plausible?

  • spike

    And that’s an excuse for such a one-sided story? Really? Did they check with USM administraton. i know it’s not popular, but how about the real world?

  • Senior

    POWER TO THESE STUDENTS FOR STANDING UP FOR WHAT THEY BELIEVE IN!

  • Ken I.

    The day white people actually just listen to a story and not think about how the victims are not white…

  • SH

    I want to thank you for telling all the lovely deeds that the Nursing department has made. One thing though, what does that have to do with this article? This scenario was wrong and will always be wrong, has literally nothing to do with their humanitarian work. If anything, it contradicts it.

    Also, my applause of free speech was sarcastic, good job catching on. Also, free speech is one thing, but use it when you actually have something plausible to say.

  • Meg J.

    Please let’s all give applause to the standard white person!

  • Kay M.

    Oh poor you, white majority.

  • spike

    Just what does that EXACTY mean: ‘And they are NURSES for goodness sake.”. That they are nurses? Does that mean they are willing to do what people like you are afraid to do? Please, make it clear what you meant by that.

  • Shay

    Just to freaking admit to their mistake.

  • Micka

    Where the hell did they mention black face????

  • SH

    I want to thank you for telling all the lovely deeds that the Nursing department has made. One thing though, what does that have to do with this article? This scenario was wrong and will always be wrong, has literally nothing to do with their humanitarian work. If anything, it contradicts it.

    Also, my applause of free speech was sarcastic, good job catching on. Also, free speech is one thing, but use it when you actually have something plausible to say.

  • Shaun Carland

    Did you not read the last sentence of the article? The SNO declined to comment. It’s not the free press’s fault that they didn’t make a statement.

  • spike

    These student nurses spent weeks in the Dominican Republic, no water, no power, no modern facilities of any kind, administering to the needs of the people there. When you’re ready to do the same, let us know. The head of the nursing department is waiting for your response. I’m sure that someone of your conviction is wiling to back it up, and that you’re not just a lot of empty words, abusive as they might be.

  • Atom

    What article are you reading? I can’t seem to find “those Africans” anywhere in it nor do I see any comments from the nursing students stating anything at all. At least you got the part that they have the right wear a costume right.

  • spike

    Good news. They are.

  • spike

    It ‘s okay. You can reply when you you wake up.

  • spike

    “micro aggression.”. “multicultural”. ‘my family when they need health care’. Maybe it’s time for honesty here 8Pi. Are you holding these nursing students responsible for your family’s health care?

  • Hani Ali

    I think we all know that dressing up as Ebola nurses is insensitive to say the least. (If you don’t see how that is wrong, this comment is not for you. Please take your ignorance elsewhere.) Do the nurses have every right to wear those costumes? Absolutely! As previous commentator have so kindly noted “this is ‘murica”. We get it. Those “multicultural” students your referring to are American as well.

    And for those of you infuriated by the fact that racism was a part of this incident, I suggest you get your information checked. Racism was never apart of this, until the nursing students insisted they weren’t ‘racist’ even though that was never even a concern. It wasn’t an issue until they referred to these students as ‘those Africans’ and ‘threatening’. It seems to me that those nursing students need an outlet to deal with their ‘white guilt’.

  • mcdk

    Mohammed, Krolak, Mohammed, and Abdulkadir… in the “multicultural center”….. Are we sure this wasn’t a deleted scene from the movie PCU?

  • spike

    Okay Stephanie. Tell us what you think these student nurses should suffer as a punishment. You are, after all, demanding that they be held accountable.

  • spike

    You’ve made your IQ abundantly clear. You applaud free speech while calling those who express it stupid. You’re not actually a student here, are you?

  • SH

    Holy shit, I am actually fucking shocked about how stupid these commentators are. Like, I’m in literally shock. Calling the cops on students for telling someone that what they’re doing is offensive? You get called on by the cops for freedom of speech? And I’m only just saying that because you idiots say this is America! Who gives a shit where we are, what those nursing students wore was IDIOTIC and IGNORANT. Just plain and simple. And calling the cops is the most ridiculous thing of all.

    Oh and yes idiot commentator #232312, both sides of the story were not shown, but that’s because the nursing students REFUSED to comment. And the fact that you idiots keep referring to them as the “multiculturals” shows how much you try to alienate people of other races and make them feel like the “other.”

    Also, to that another idiot commentator who said the students were comparing the incident to “black face,” where is that said in the article? Where is it even insinuated?

    It’s laughable how many ignorant people go to this school, maybe Its a good that the university is changing. So you all can get the certificates you deserve and not the degrees you dont have enough IQ points for.

  • Emily

    Does anyone know if they’ve reported this? They utilized a tasteless outfit that could have easily caused hysteria, especially with the WIDESPREAD Ebola scare in the US, they made a false call to the police when they were told how offensive their costumes were – all the while defaming these (multicultural) students by filing a false and completely unnecessary police report. Tell me, what kind of ‘threat’ did these students pose to the two nurses? That’s ridiculous! And they are NURSES for goodness sake.

  • ssaa

    a direct quote from the BDN from the student who went to them with this story: “We were just trying to make them understand how they hurt our
    feelings,” she said. “We kept telling them that this is killing people
    and that’s why it’s so hurtful, why it’s so disrespectful to the
    families of the people who have been affected by this disease.”

  • spike

    But they are. It’s called using the system. Why is racism synonymous with white. Does anyone out there truly believe these nurses’ intentions were racist, either actual or subliminal. Let’s be honest. We have become so intent on proving how politically correct we are that we are willing to sacrifice reason.

  • Atom

    Things are really getting out of hand in this country when you start attacking a day like Halloween. I can somewhat understand targeting the religious holidays in our country, not that I agree with it. Now we have people trying to take away us dressing in a costume. I’m surprised this is even a story really, don’t these people have anything else to worry about. Shouldn’t someone in charge of this “multi-cultural” class be teaching these girls the culture that they are now living in.

  • spike

    They called the police because they were offended? Really? I hadn’t heard that. Maybe you should ask them why they called the police. And maybe USM should make this a campus friendly to ALL ethnicities.

  • YoursTruly

    It’s Halloween time.. After finding out that it was just a suit they could have easily walked away and respected the nurses party and they themselves could have gone on with their night with no problems . This clearly is not a sign of racism , if it was me at a party and I had 5 or so individuals clearly having an issue with my costume but that was all I brought I would have to keep it on just for the night then say the next day well that was a horrible choice. And laugh it off. And there would no unnecessary drama over a simple misunderstanding. I Understand racism is definitely not even close to being banished but this just doesn’t SCREAM ( haha Halloween joke) racism to me.

  • spike

    And by the way free press, what happened to presenting both sides of the story. You and your “reporter” should be ashamed. Student nurses on their way to a costume party, the very same nurses who may someday be risking their live treating ebola patients, relieving the tension of a very frieghtening situation with some humor, are labeled as racist? Ask some of them where they were a few months ago and who they were helping. How many of your “multiculturals” will be doing that? It’s astonishing, and sad, that we have allowed ourselves to become so pc that a Halloween costume which is by no stretch of a reasonable imagination racist is labelled racist. The label has become a catch-all used by too many to further their own interests. Again, one side of the story is no story.

  • Anonymous

    Have it your way, then. This isn’t about hurt feelings.

  • karl

    maybe it was a stupid decision but it wasn’t racist. we all make stupid decisions every now and then but the media doesn’t go writing about them. grow up!

  • Anonymous

    Not during an Ebola scare.

  • HarvardGrad

    Have you seen some of the distasteful Halloween costumes out there, this is just a suit, no blood, nothing lewd, no profanity and nothing sexual. You should be proud of these two females for keeping their skin covered unlike many other college students who parade around half naked for halloween wearing costumes better suted for the bedroom. On a positive note, im sure their costumes were a huge hit at the Nurses Function!

  • HarvardGrad

    Yes, i was taken aback by that statement as well…..rediculous!

  • HarvardGrad

    I have re-read this article and honestly cannot believe it was even written. If i was the person in charge i would have this taken down. This is outrageous!!!

  • James56

    Maybe we should ALL not be here and let the Native Americans live in peace and prosperity.

  • HarvardGrad

    WOW! I cannot believe such ignorant people still exist in todays scociety, these two students dressed in the ‘Halloween Costumes’ did absolutely nothing wrong, why is everyone so damn sensitive these days, we cant walk down the street in regular clothes without ‘offending’ someone now days. The way i see it from reading this report, is, 5 students went out of there way, instead of minding their own business, and caused this little issue themselves. They had no right to approach these two women and no right to act the way they did. Im glad i wasnt approached by the 5 because i would have given them a piece of my mind. As for feeling unsafe, this, in my opinion, has nothing to do with race, if i was approached by 5 people all at once i would be affraid as well. The bottom line is this, these two women did nothing wrong and this is being blown waaayyy out of proportion. Get over it people. Case closed.

  • sailor2305

    by the CDC* my apologies for the mistype.

  • Allyson c

    I wasn’t there – but my feeling is the nurses felt threatened themselves and were trying to be proactive in case the situation escalated! I would have done the same thing! This is America – we are supposed to be a “free country”, but I guess the “Multi Cultural” students feel they are the only ones that should be allowed to do whatever they want! Also, it seems to me that the multi cultural students are making a much bigger deal of this than is necessary! My advice to them is they should be as tolerate of Americans as they expect Americans to be to them – I think that’s kind of the “golden rule” otherwise maybe they shouldn’t be here!

  • sailor2305

    So I wanna know what makes these costume based actuall protective wardobe used my CDC, military and other organization and say a slutty nurse outfit. Ebola does not just affect Africa or the the African American communtiy. It is a world wide problem. These students have every right to dress up that way. The students who claimed that the are offensive yes tthey have the right to say it offends them but once is enough. Once they became agressive they lost any right to claim anything. I am in the milirary and if I felt like I was be targeted by a few people I would call the police on them as well. Race has nothing to do with the fact that. These studnts just escalated a small problem between students into a media storm of bull crap.

  • howard

    it was a HALLOWEEN party. people wear COSTUMES at halloween parties. get a grip.

  • Chasseur1814

    You are correct, we are in America and you do have rights; the right to life (unless you are a child in pro-choice womb), liberty (unless you want to pray in public shcool), and the pursuit of happiness (note, you have the right to pursue happiness, it doesn’t guarantee you will achieve it).

    Unfortunately, our founding fathers appeared to have been rather short-sighted and neglected to include the right to never be offended or have your feelings hurt as one the inalienable rights endowed by our creator.

  • Anonymous

    Remove the “multicultural.” People on campus in hazmat suits. Massive publicity in all forms of media about ebola that is causing panic.

  • Susan H

    Seriously??? The “Multi Cultural” students were “struck by a torrent of fear, anger and confusion”??

  • Anonymous

    If campus security didn’t notice people walking around in hazmat suits and verify what was going on, then there are bigger problems.

  • Chasseur1814

    I have news for you, if you think this is bad, you should see some of the other stuff that goes in nursing and medical schools. With your attitude I would learn first aid real fast because you wouldn’t want your kids around most doctors and nurses.

  • Chasseur1814

    Really, you should see the stuff that goes on in medical schools when only students are around.

  • Carlotta

    Most of these comments are disheartening. I don’t understand how students could think that dressing up as Ebola nurses…in a college setting….where they are being trained to treat patients that might be infected…is perceived as anything other than disrespectful. Add this to the fact that they called the police because students were offended is well….offensive. USM obviously has a long way to go to make this a campus that is friendly to students of other ethnicities.

  • Anonymous

    Is this what you risked your life for? “This is America, we have rights.” abused by every crank?

  • Anonymous

    This has nothing to do with political correctness. It was a stupid decision on the part of the nursing students.

  • Anonymous

    It’s the “multicultural” that get you, isn’t it. This says more about the mentality of the nursing students than anything else. (And you can keep these types away from my family when they need health care). Using the childish “sticks and stones” reference means you have never been the object of mass aggression. Beyond that – it was a stupid, insensitive costume, and I doubt the health authorities would laugh.

  • ATVrider

    if anyone is expressing racism here its the multicultural students for comparing these girls to “black face”. how does a hazmat suit compare?

  • Chasseur1814

    They are responsible for the most reprehensible and wide spread crime there is today: “hurt feelings”.

    I am retired military, and when friends and family ask me if I have ever killed anyone, I use to reply, “No, but I hurt some feelings.” In today’s Politically Correct atmosphere, I think I am better off saying I actually did kill people rather than hurt their feelings.

  • Chasseur1814

    I am not sure about the “slutty nurse”, I don’t think they are authorized under Obama Care!

  • bob

    campus security was called because the multicultural students confronted them several times in a 15 min span. wasn’t once enough? I would have called for help too!

  • devan

    or celebrate thanksgiving

  • Anonymous

    Pretty soon we won’t even be able to say, “Merry Halloween” anymore.

  • KHP

    Or a “slutty nurse” no one is offended by that.

  • KHP

    Accountable for what?

  • Lucy Ball

    Yup keep letting their sensitivities walk all over us.

  • bennymodeen

    BUT…., don’t despair, it’s still OK to dress like a blood-soaked chainsaw killer.

  • Anonymous

    Thank you Liberals for so much political correctness. Surprising they didn’t file charges for a hate crime. Only multi-cultural unless it is something whites do.

  • Chasseur1814

    “Leila Mohamed, well versed in how to communicate sensitive issues and combat micro aggression, felt well equipped to talk to the nurses and express her and her friend’s feelings in a respectful way” obviously Ms. Mohamed’s communication skills and opinion of her abilities is vastly over rated–more akin to throwing kerosene on fire rather than dealing with “micro aggression.”

    I suggest these “multicultural” students get a life and stop being so serious either in what someone wears or when some approaches them with a complaint. But then again I come from the “sticks and stones” school of not letting names bother me.

  • Stephanie MacDonald

    Really disgusted by this. The students who dressed up in the costumes need to be held accountable.

  • Anonymous

    Both have no sense of humor or civility

  • Curious Mainer

    think they might be connected in anyway?

  • N/A

    That is because nobody cares about the constant racism that happens everyday on campus. Everyone cares about the state of the institution, but racism? Not as important. It’s fucked up and things like this will keep happening and nothing will be done.